Why are we so worried about China’s first aircraft carrier?

On August 14th, 1912, the United States launched its first aircraft carrier, the USS Langley. This 11,500 ton ship served during both World Wars until its luck ran out near Java in 1942 and had to be abandoned and sunk in order to avoid capture by the Japanese.

Almost one hundred years later, China has just launched its first aircraft carrier and the U.S. State department is demanding to know why.

“We would welcome any kind of explanation that China would like to give for needing this kind of equipment,” said Victoria Nuland, a State department spokeswoman.

Let me give you the explanation, Victoria. China is the world’s largest country and has recently become the second largest economy behind the United States. China is also the undisputed powerhouse in Asia. Is that a good enough explanation for you?

Nuland  also called for more transparency from China stating that “in our military-to-military relations with many countries around the world, we have the kind of bilateral dialogue where we can get quite specific about the equipment that we have and its intended purposes and its intended movements.”

Is that the best you can come up with, Gloria? How transparent are we with our military equipment and operations?  Are we now trading information about our military hardware and intentions for the sake of transparency?

The State Department looks plain silly whenever it whines and cries about Chinese military ambitions. No matter how much fear it drums up about China’s so called threat to stability in Asia,  the United States really has very little moral high ground to stand on here. The Chinese  have not threatened us. They are not actively sponsoring terrorism or calling for the annihilation of any of our allies.  The evolution of China’s military reflects its explosive development and expanding economic interests worldwide.

The idea that China wants to take over the world is  misguided and largely rooted in  Cold War hysteria. While the Chinese people are intensely nationalistic, they are not a bellicose people. They do not seek to make war unless their domestic interests are directly threatened.

What those domestic issues are, of course, is a hot point of contention. From the Taiwan Strait to the Yellow Sea, these ‘domestic’ challenges do have global implications. Nonetheless, military advancements such as this new aircraft carrier do fall within China’s rights as a sovereign nation to protect its national interests.

The same can be said about the United States and the 11 aircraft carriers that serve her throughout the world.

Instead of complaining about China’s latest military toys, the State Department should be picking up where President Bush left off by continuing to pressure the Chinese on the issue of human rights. It is sad that police beatings, religious persecution, limitations on free speech, and unfair trials are still all too common here. We can have the biggest impact on China’s future by firmly encouraging the Chinese government to institute the necessary reforms that will help China to fully emerge from her dark and oppressive past.

There will always be conflict between the United States and the People’s Republic of China. That much is certain. What is also certain is that the United States is going to have to make  room for China as a world power.

Napoleon supposedly once remarked, “China is a sleeping giant.  Let her lie and sleep, for when she awakens she will astonish the world.”

She has awakened and whether we like it or not, she is here to stay.

5 Responses to Why are we so worried about China’s first aircraft carrier?

  1. sonnybardin says:

    1- chinese naval expansion is not being worried about 2- it should be 3-chinese ongoing “aquesition” of soveriegn philippine territory by intimidation& dissinformation is the proof of point2 4-the rareness of media coverage of chinese naval expansion is the proof of point 1

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  2. Erich says:

    The author of this article is a real douche.

    Now I know why he doesn’t list his location. He knows he’d be getting his commie loving ass kicked all over China by real Americans. Do you really think you’re safe from retribution? In China, all you need is a name and people in the right places. You will pay for this faggot. We know where you are. Payback is a bitch.

    Sweet dreams.

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    Robert Vance Reply:

    I’m confused? Pay for what? My opinion?

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    乔希 Reply:

    I have no idea what you think he said that could possibly be offensive to any American. The state department DOES look silly when it complains about things like this.

    So how are your plans for payback coming along anyway?

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  3. It seems odd that many spy novelists, Clancy, Thor, Flynn et al Griffin, have pointed out for now a decade the danger of the PRC’s Asian two ocean navy. They are building subs that will challenge the US and the 7th Fleet. They can hold Taiwan hostage now anytime and Japan, well, it still depends on the USA. With this horrid CEO-CIC we have in DC today, I and no one else I know expects Obama to challenge back . He wants to neuter our military and if he wins again, we will look like Greece both domestically and internationally. An aircraft carrier can also bring up to date Chinese planes into action far quicker than the DOD and Dept. of State think.To counter this , America should re-do DIA, CIA and NSA by dumping all the entrenched bureaucrats with liberal sympathies and start from the ground up to humintel and other sources other than just electronic. And we should make sure all of those agencies have younger Cyber experts to fire back at both China, Russia and the Iranian and other Islamofascists on that level. So as a worldwide plan, this one carrier looks like the start a first step; but China has already been expanding its Navy and electronic warfare capabilities far more than the Obama led DOD and CIA could have factored in for the next few year.

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